Sinkhole appears in busy Cleveland street

The Source News

ARIANA DEELEY

IMG_0237 A sinkhole appeared on Middle St, Cleveland on September 27th, and Council have since excavated the area to begin repairs. Source: Ariana Deeley

Redland City Council has begun emergency roadworks after a sinkhole appeared in Middle Street, Cleveland, early Sunday evening

The sinkhole appeared just 30 centimeters wide at the surface, but extended two meters deep when it opened on the side of the road, opposite Cleveland Bowls Club.

A Redland City Council spokesperson said they believe the sinkhole was caused by damage to the storm water system, and believe repairs will prevent the problem reoccurring in the future.

“While uncommon, ground subsidence does occur from time to time in urban areas,” the spokesperson said.

“Officers have assessed the area and believe there is no likelihood of further erosion.”

IMG_0240 (2) The sinkhole appeared on the side of the road, frequented by cyclists. Source: Ariana Deeley

The sinkhole is…

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Ferrari launches new showroom to meet demand of QLD enthusiasts

The Source News

ARIANA DEELEY

Brisbane’s Ferrari dealership has officially opened the doors to its new showroom to meet the growing demand of Queensland customers.

Positioned on the high profile corner of Breakfast Creek Road and Waterloo Street, the 550 square meter showroom is fully built to the new Ferrari International Corporate Identity standards.

Managing Director of Ferrari Brisbane, Martin Roller said this was a big investment on their behalf, however the Ferrari brand has been going from strength to strength in Australia, and in particular Queensland.

“Queensland has been the fastest growing region in Australia over the last 12 months with an increase in sales of 300% over the previous year,” Mr Roller said.

“It’s very understandable because if you look at the way property prices are, the economy has strengthened in both the gold coast and Brisbane.”

Martin Roller said the aim was to bring to car as close to the street as possible with the new showroom. Photo: Supplied Martin Roller said the aim was to bring to car as close to the…

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Zoo Magazine Responds to Critics With Controversial Final Issue

The Source News

ARIANA DEELEY

Zoo Mag Spread In the final issue, the Zoo editors admit their biggest mistakes and most controversial articles. Photo: Ariana Deeley

Controversial Men’s magazine, Zoo certainly haven’t held back with their final issue, which depicts a hand sticking up the middle finger on the front cover.

The final issue was released on Monday after Zoo Magazine publisher, Bauer Media confirmed the magazine would be closing down, in a statement last month.

Bauer Media CEO, David Goodchild said in the statement “With tough retail conditions in the men’s market, Bauer has made the call to close Zoo’s operations.”

However there is much speculation that a change.org petition run by Laura Pintur from Collective Shout started the magazine’s downfall, after it led to Coles supermarket caving to public pressure and removing the magazine from its shelves.

The controversial final cover image is partnered with the text, “Sticking it up the prudes one last time.”

When asked about the final cover, Ms Pintur responded…

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Ethical business for long term profitability

The Source News

ARIANA DEELEY

Image: supplied

Raising business above the bottom line was a key issue raised at the Global Integrity Summit in Brisbane on Wednesday.

Scholars and business professionals agreed, rather than just thinking about making a profit, businesses around the world need to realise operating ethically brings greater return in the long run.

Managing Director of Good Super in Australia, Professor Andrew MacLeod said part of the issue is the debate in public that either you’re ethical or you’re profitable.

However, performing ethically creates value and therefore long term profitability.

“There is this assumption in the public that to be profitable, you have to be evil, and if you’re going to be good, you’re going to make a loss,” Mr MacLeod said.

“The reason ethical investing funds outperform the market is actually quite simple; if you perform ethically, you’re long term risk framework is lower and therefore, your long term…

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Zoo Magazine Responds to Critics With Controversial Final Issue

ARIANA DEELEY

Controversial Men’s magazine, ‘Zoo’ certainly haven’t held back with their final issue, which depicts a hand sticking up the middle finger on the front cover.

Zoo Mag Final Cover
Zoo Weekly Magazine Australia sticks it to critics with final cover issue. Photo: instagram.com/zooweeklydigital

The final issue was released today, after Zoo Magazine Publisher, Bauer Media confirmed the magazine would be closing down, in a statement last month.

Bauer Media CEO, David Goodchild said in the statement “With tough retail conditions in the men’s market, Bauer has made the call to close Zoo’s operations.”

However there is much speculation that a change.org petition run by Laura Pintur from Collective Shout started the magazine’s downfall, after it led to Coles supermarket caving to public pressure and removing the magazine from its shelves.

The controversial final cover image is partnered with the text, “Sticking it up the prudes one last time.”

When asked about the final cover, Laura Pintur responded “I’m to prudish to look.”

The final issue is filled with an array of the publication’s most controversial articles and images from over the years of its existence.

Zoo Mag Spread
In the final issue, the Zoo editors admit their biggest mistakes and most controversial articles. Photo: Ariana Deeley

While the magazine will stay on shelves for another week, Zoo Magazine Australia have taken down their Facebook page, and have not responded to any questions.

Meanwhile, a number of Twitter users express their feelings about the magazine’s closure:

https://twitter.com/briannatravers/status/644781005203632128

https://twitter.com/KateOnTheGo/status/644428047072931840

The Ice Bucket Challenge’s Surprising Success

By Ariana Deeley

This time last year, social media feeds were flooded with videos of people being drenched with iced water, all in the name of ALS research. It was known as ‘The Ice Bucket Challenge’.

ALS (Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), also known as Motor Neuron Disease (MND), is a terminal, neurodegenerative disease and whilst there is no effective treatment, funds from the Ice Bucket Challenge have allowed scientists to make significant breakthroughs.

Scientists from John Hopkins Medical recently announced a discovery which may lead to a treatment or even a cure, and are largely attributing their success to funds raised by the campaign in 2014.

Despite receiving much criticism, the viral campaign raised over $220 million US dollars for ALS and MND organisations worldwide, allowing the scientists to conduct ‘high-risk, high-reward’ experiments.

Jimmy Fallon taking the Ice Bucket Challenge on The Tonight Show with guests, Rob Riggle, Horatio Sanz, Steve Higgins, and The Roots, in August 2014.
Jimmy Fallon taking the Ice Bucket Challenge on The Tonight Show with guests, Rob Riggle, Horatio Sanz, Steve Higgins, and The Roots, in August 2014.

Executive Director of MND Australia, Carol Birks said not much is known about the disease, so any advances in research is a big step forward.

“MND is a very, very complex disease and any advances in the research is helping put another piece in the puzzle towards a treatment,” Ms Birks said.

“I think the Ice Bucket challenge money has really accelerated research worldwide, which is just wonderful.”

With funds raised from last year’s campaign, MND Australia recently awarded the ‘Ice Bucket Challenge Grant’ to its research arm, of $350,000 per year for three years.

“That’s the first time we’ve ever been able to award a project grant like this,” Ms Birks said.

“It’s a big collaboration of all the top researchers and clinicians in Australia, all focused on MND, and a collaboration with some top International researchers as well, so that’s starting next month.”

MND and ALS organisations worldwide are pushing the challenge again this year and every August forward, until a cure is found.

Ms Birks said although the 2014 challenge brought great results, a one-off injection into funding won’t be enough to find a cure.

“We need to ensure that the funds keep going so that we can keep supporting people with MND and keep supporting the researchers to do their work”.

To donate to MND Australia or take part in this year’s challenge, click here.